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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
and corporate tax it is time to change so people can keep their own money and foster an environment where businesses want to invest andreate good paying jobs. he would hike the 4 percent sales tax and some say like it up to washington d.c., is that right or wrong? i am dave asbin. we'll go to steve and rich and mike and john, you love this idea and think it is good for the whole, country explain. >> one of the scandal is not the deficits, but the fact that federal government collects 2.5 trillion. with the consumption or sales tax, this is the lone way we can limit how much money gets to the federal government and more businesses would be created and jobs and the federal government would not be penalizing our work and we would get more work and jobs. >> sounds good to me, rick, to you? >> here's the problem. i will not touch incredibly regressive nature of this. >> by regressive, it hits the poor more than the rich? >> exactly. put the brakes on a economy, imagine what happens here. first of all, to keep the revenue neutral, you are looking at a 20r 30 percent sales tax . add that to the
, these are women who have either come out of this environment, out of an urban center in particular. we have our own struggles in the rural parts of america. we need to bring these things to the discussion. that is what we need to do. i do not think we will find solutions to the questions that the caller had until we get those people living with the struggles of the table. that means more women, more african-americans, more hispanics, more men and women of color. i feel strongly that we need more women in this discussion. we're still sitting at 20% of congress. we have a long way to go. host: caller in richmond, democrats line. caller: i was wondering how we will ever get equal pay when states like virginia have the right to work law and they can fire you for any reason. and the company i work for, if you discuss what you make to another employee, you can get fired. guest: it is about laws. laws are made by elected officials. who is representing us at the state legislature and in congress matters. we can overturn right to work laws. and we can pass it will pay laws. we need the right people to s
to be an economic and political environment. that's going to be the story for 2013. >> we get a lot of people who come in who it seems to me lately there's a big divergence. there are those who are optimistic about things and think things will go well. others that say, forget it, we've seen all the gains. which camp would you put yourself in? >> i guess i'm not wholistically in either camp. it's more an optimist than a pessimist. we've seen stock correlations begin to fall a little bit. that's encouraging. it says that investors are begin to go loor fop companies that figure out how to make money in a slow growth environment. not sure what the indices will do, but i think the companies that are positioned to save other people company. i was thinking about the people who sell cnbc their coffee cups. you don't do that. somebody has figured out how to do that on large scale and make a lot of money doing it. so those kinds of companies we're going to look for. that means selectivity. that means looking in place that's we don't like from a mook row point of view such as europe. >> but from the average
in the ecosystem. >> basically it's come to this. the environment where these pythons now live is not used to them. these creatures have evolved from places like the rainforest in southeast asia or the african savannah, and the habitat or the grassland habitat that you find in the everglades just simply is not equipped to deal with these very new and very invasive species. basically these pythons are invaders, and they are eating everything they come in contact with. >> you say these very new, are these pythons that were people's pets? >> likely that's how all of this originated. pot past 30 years people have been importing these snakes. a lot less lately. but during the 1970s and 1980s thousands and thousands of these snakes were brought in from asia and africa, and more often than not they either escaped because of hurricanes or people released them into environments where they shouldn't have, and these animals took over. they started out as pets, and then through negligence were released and, unfortunately, this ecosystem just really is not prepared to take on what these snakes do to the enviro
environment. >> they are more parsimonious today but he also said tell the truth because sooner or later people will find out. that is still a modern day public relations. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn0-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. mortgage. married. two great kids. he wants to protect his family with a $500,000 term life insurance policy. what do you think it'll cost him? a hundred dollars a month? sixty? forty? actually none of the above. john can get a $500,000 policy -from a highly rated insurer - for under $25 a month. his secret? selectquote. selectquote is impartial. they'll search the pick of insurers like these to give you a choice of your best prices. selectquote has great savings on term life for women, too. john's wife carrie, can get a $500,000 policy for under $16 a month. selectquote has helped make term life insurance affordable for hundreds of thousands of peo
in absence of traffic and perp dishtion lard to the tracks to make for a much safer environment. we've got new signage and pavement markings to make that clear. as everybody was stuck on the subway, i rode my bike yesterday and rode passed it. it's a significant safety improvement, not bust for cyclists, but for f line operators. it's a very busy area. we have 120 people -- it's about a third of the left turns off of market street during rush hour, our cyclists. so, they're taking a whole lot of vehicles off the road by being on their bikes. this will enable them to do so safety and connective. we have the greenway signal times for bicycle speed. so, small but significant safety improvement there. moving on to parking, last thursday we met with residents and merchants in the northeast mission area. you may recall, i guess it was earlier this year, we rolled out coined of a large parking management strategy covering a large area including potrero hill and dogpatch and mission bay. we got pretty significant feedback and it was not positive feedback in terms of our plan and process. so, as we
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
environment go away. mike mipg travis, what happens in your business in this coming year? >> we had two huge rollouts the left model for chord buddy 20% of people are left handed the classical model for chord buddy will not happen. we will not get the breaks that we needed to write off that money, you know, tax wise. >> let it's not there anymore new product somebody has got it to build if it and ship it and sell it it's several jobs down the line that went happen because you don't have the money to make that work. >> right. >> all right. and, john, you talked about there may be fewer folks out on the road with you. >> yeah. that means what happens to those people? where do they go? what can they do? >> it's that effect of people losing jobs. and, you know, it's -- i mean, it's a painful thing to let somebody go that you have been working with for years and years. especially in music and what i do. that's part of what you do. it's part of your sound. at the end of the day you are looking at your paper and looking at your numbers. and i'm not going to run a business in the red. i'm not going
problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
environment. the nature of our debate of cyber has been the digital pearl harbor. the greater national security threat is the gradual loss of intellectual property. it is effort by a thousand cuts. part of the challenge at 35 is not just scaling costs but the leakage through cyber theft, which does not mean someone else can build it but they are gaining knowledge and capacity in a way they would not have been able to. something that may have given you a ten-year advantage does not give you that kind of advantage at technological capacity. >> i would like to tie it back to our economy and jobs. president obama said the focus would be to increase jobs. i come back to paul. you said that the success of our [indiscernible]channel some of the budget from the dod to the state department. i take this time to say that hillary clinton is coming back to work today. i wish her great recovery. if we have projected our intent is to china and the world. looking at the way china has been aggressive many ways in the south china sea. [indiscernible]how do we look into that without freedom of navigation
things. carbon tax anything dealing with the environment, climate change, i would be surprised. if he's going to cause the freak out with the executive order of gun control, that takes up so much oxygen, and you can only have so many of those freaks outs, and he can't do it seven or eight times. >> john: i think america has seen enough g.o.p. freak outs. >> they want to do something about climate change, but it's only when the economy is humming well when we ask companies to cut down on emissions. but right now there is no room to maneuver on this at all. >> john: getting the cab cabinet nominees confirmed, gun control where is he the most vulnerable on? >> i think they're doing this small incremental attack him on everything trying to bog him down on the simplest things which cabinet nominees used to be automatic. they decided well, we're going to attack, attack, attack, and make him use up capital. i don't think they have a grand strategy. i don't think they're looking down the road six, eight months, this is where we'll set our trap. they made it clear from 2009 we'll obstruct ever
very low. by historical standards. though they are starting to tick up. the default environment is still relatively benign. one of the things that i think gets lost on investors is since 2008 we have refinanced the entire high yield market. there is two ben fritz that from. one is you clearly have a lower interest rate because of lower rates but the second thing we've done is push out maturity. even if there is weakness, which we would not rule out, most companies are pretty well positioned to survive that and they don't have near term mature its. which is always a concern from a high yield investors because, you know, banks can be fickle. we know that. so from a credit standpoint, things are very strong. >> how much go you take into kri consideration, the macro economy, how much does it play when you're putting together a portfolio. >> macro sets the guard rail of the idea. you will deemphasize home builders or building products. right now for example, we are concerned about europe. from the standpoint of credit, we look at european exposure and incorporate that. you can see we
to a normal environment i think. cheryl: really good point. watching the pendulum swing all the way over to the wrong side for investors. >> america's banks have capital. that's how we got through the crisis so well. industry paid for everything other than citi group. that's the only major bank. cheryl: thank you very much, interesting points today. >> thank you. cheryl: closing bell will ring, and we now have got 48 minutes to go on the monday. athena health in the palm of your hand. the company's going mobile taking information on patients, doctors, and providers to another level. it's really interesting. athena health president and ceo talking about how that translates into future profits for the company, and the prognosis for athena health for 20 # 13. that's coming up next, but as we break, look at thena's stock over the past year. it's a nice chart. we'll be right back. ♪ look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 ho
. it will focus on the low interest rate environment and we'll see a pop in these commodities again. is that your play? >> gold is special. i think, don't think of gold as a commodity. think of it as a currency. i think that is what the world's fourth or fifth currency, it will gain more popularity. everyone wants to deflate their currency. other commodities we need a stronger economy. could be second half play. could be somewhere out next year. i'm, i'm the equity strategist. i don't claim to be an expert on this. there is value there. we'll start with oil. i think gold is different. other commodities will come along later on. ashley: scott is the race to debase across the world really and it has been going on for some time. gold has not really responded in the rate you think it would. what do you, what is your thought on gold and where it goes from here? >> we're in really not that interested in gold right now. ashley: no? >> i think it's going to pretty much flat line from here and it's just something that moves in the rest of the year along with any political moves. same way we're cautiously
. that's the bleed air. and that bleed air usually does everything from controlling the environment within the cabin, the heating and the cooling, onboard electronics. what makes the dreamliner so different, so unique, is the amount of innovation that's gone in to using these lithium ion batteries in order to run the electronics on the plane. well, part of the problem here is, you're taking an amount of electricity that is coming off of these generators, in a very confined and small space, andrew, i mean this would be different if you were in the middle of a power plant. you'd say no problem. companies do this all the time. now you're trying to do this inside of an airplane. we should point out, this has gone through certification at the faa, repeated testing. it's not like they're just throwing these planes up there and there hasn't been any kind of safety checks. they went through extensive tests. if the issue now is was there, and this is something i think we're going to hear about in the next couple of days, is there a specific, perhaps malfunction with some of the electronics a
environment go away. >> mike: all right. travis, what happens to your business in this coming year? >> we had two huge rollouts and the left-handed model for chord buddy, 20% of people are left-handed and the classical model it's not going to happen. we will not get the breaks that are need today write off that money tax-wise, it's not there anymore. >> mike: new product means you've got to manufacture more, means somebody's got to build it, somebody's got to ship it, somebody's got to sell it, so it's several jobs down the line, that won't happen because you don't have the money to make that work. >> right. >> and john, you talked about may be fewer folks out on the road with you. >> yeah. >> mike: what happens to those people, where do they go? what can they do? >> it's that effect of people losing jobs. and i mean, it's a painful thing to let somebody go that you've been working with for years and years and especially in music and what i do. that's part of what you do and part of your sound, but at the end of the day looking at your papers and your numbers and i'm not going to run a busine
to even entertain something like this in an environment like this. i mean, the whole capital system is burning that they've got control over, and they're doing something goofy like this. >> well, it was the national endowment from the arts, just in case everybody's wondering, that's who's behind this. collected the taxpayer money together and sat down and thought about how should we pirg out how to bestow this upon, you know, worthy folks -- neil: it's clearly aimed at the young. >> oh, yeah. i guess, they want to insure that it's a built-in base of supporters going forward. neil: but the idea being you need more money to fix this problem with money you say we don't have. >> right. we're absolutely broke, but we're going to train kids that they should be battling big oil more than anything else. before you learn how to do math, before you learn how to read, before you learn how to balance your own checkbook, before you learn how to balance the country's checkbook -- which, i admit, is near hi impossible at this -- nearly impossible at this point -- instead let's go out and there and
to come and learn and fire at east atrocious weapons, but do it in a safe, you know, environment, and the most important thing that would start a buy log between the gun owners and the first responders or the people that actually have been in combat, and the big thing about that, i think it will alleviate a big problem, which is the mistrust of these gun owners of law enforcement. so you put them together -- >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: they will see that the cops aren't nazis coming to get their guns but they will start a buy log -- >> stephanie: maybe they can have a dialogue about what it looks like to walk into a grade school and see what they have to see -- >> caller: exactly. that's what i mean. it's like you can go and -- i -- i don't hunt, but i like skeet shooting. i have been to, you know firing ranges. but if you put them together you lower the paranoia you lower the rhetoric. you lower the insane debate. >> stephanie: yeah that's what i don't get. right-wingers are all law and order until the police have a thought. >> but you are assuming ev
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
. defense attorneys for the boy claim he was raised in a violent environment and taught killing people was okay. child welfare authorities in fact, jenna, made more than 20 visits to the home checking on the boy. but the public defender representing him argued the youngster joined his fare, a regional leader of the national socialist movement, to nazi rallies and to the mexican border to learn how to keep mex ans out of the u.s. they say he had a violent streak. stabbing a teacher while in kindergarten with a pencil and the question in this case is did know what he was doing was wrong? his 11-year-old sister told her days ahead of time he planned to shoot his dad to avoid a breakup with their step mom. that is where the case today back in court. it is heard by a judge, not a jury. that judge will decide if there was premedcation and -- premeditation and whether or not his fathers beliefs and the boy's exposure to neo-nazi tactics led to the murder. if the judge rules he is guilty he could be held by juvenile authorities until he is 23. that is the latest, jenna. jenna: what a case. jam
a shop than it is in a -- [inaudible] environment. and the version of the colorado law makes the law enforcement side much more challenging. >> so the next thing a state could do is simply repeal, right? and say, well, if you're going to crack down on a regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, and do what you can. >> you might notice that i think some of the initial efforts were a bit rebellious by nature. every marijuana user just -- [inaudible] i think some of them have a distaste for this becoming legal because now they're abiding with the law. [laughter] so i think what there is is a very aggressive response. you are going to see much more aggressive versions of the law, and by that i mean versions of just repeal. >> it's interesting, what we're seeing here is in some ways the breakdown of a federal/state law enforcement partnership in which the feds rely very heavily on the states which leads us to michael greve who will give us some broader context on what we're seeing unfold here. >> right. i'm against partnerships, and i'll explain why. there is a sort o
prizes, al gore got a nobel peace prize for the environment because he opposed george bush. i mean, you win these prizes for political reasons not for actually be the recipient of a valid prize. >> that's true, but in a case like this, people's reactions are going to be huh? say what? >> there you go. >> make it somebody that people don't have mouths agape when you declare who it is. stuart: we wanted charles to have opinion on this, charles payne, he was supposed to be here. where is he, any idea where charles is? ah, he was on the fox news channel, wait a second. do i hear the man? yes, charles, enter. charles: can i come in. >> yea, welcome. stuart: you've got a mic on. charles: i do a have mic on. stuart: 20 seconds to tell me your opinion of bill clinton father of the year. charles: i don't like the awards going to the big name guys. there's fathers out there working two jobs, going to school, struggling. tired of these guys, celebrity culture we live in, got to be bill clinton one year, and bloomberg the next year, forget about it, i don't want to hear about these guys. i want the
>> brian, we're all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us. their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i had done about iraq, ev before we went into iraq was conditioned by, tempered by that experience in vietnam and whatever i will ever do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shaped me just like anyone who has gone through war. those experiences shape you very much. and one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined, i suspect, to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things, diplomacy is critically important especially in a complicated world that we live in today. i think something else is important here
with a cascading flood of cuts. and for that kind of an environment, you don't need somebody who is an outsider who doesn't have the practical experience and who's nakedly ambitious for the job. >> tom cotton is a republican congressman, veteran of the wars in iraq and afghanistan. thank you for coming in. >> thank you, wolf. good to be here with you. >> why do you oppose the nomination of chuck hagel to be defense secretary? >> wolf, the president said that chuck hagel is the leader our troops deserve. i couldn't disagree any more strongly. our troops deserve much better than a man who voted to send them to war when it was popular and then abandon those very troops when it was unpopular. i would know, wolf. i was one of those troops. i returned from iraq in november 2006 with my platoon from the 101st airborne just as chuck hagel was writing that we couldn't achieve victory in iraq, that time for more troops had passed and it was time to withdraw. he just didn't oppose the surge, wolf. he called it the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country's history since vietnam. he delayed emerge
only voted for obama. that kind of sets up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. our first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have t
for gun shows and that's about all you are going to get from, you know, in the current environment with the republican congress. >> stephanie: i have said that but i think we should do whatever we can. >> caller: but at the same time you talk about high-cap ban, and assault weapon ban, and what you guys may not understand is like in california there is the highest capacity you can have is ten. well, you can buy a legally what they call a 10-30 magazine, so it's limited to 10 rounds and you can just alter it and make at it 30-round. and atf has about ten features they list that define an assault weapon, and if you have three or four of those features it is an assault weapon by definition. >> stephanie: which shooter was it -- it's hard to keep track anymore. but he had 6,000 rounds bill. >> caller: right. >> stephanie: i mean what -- i'm just saying -- what is wrong with this picture? we're having -- >> caller: well -- >> stephanie: -- military type slaughters in our schools and movie theaters. >> caller: stephanie you buy boxes of wine. do you need that -- >> st
more than 461 planets where life might exist in a rocky environment. >>> a boeing 787 had a fire break out monday on a dreamliner that was parked at boston's logan airport. the empty plane has been in service for less than a month. a cleaning crew found the cabin filled with smoke. there were no injuries, and federal officials are investigating. >>> and the "new york post" says hillary clinton got a football helmet as a gag gift from her state department colleagues on her first day back to work monday after a concussion that caused a blood clot. a spokesman says "as you know washington is a contact sport." think they got a great sense of humor over there. >>> if you're making travel plans for this year fasten your seat belts. air fares and hotel prices are expected to rise again in 2013. cbs news travel editor peter greenberg is here with more of this year's good and the bad news travel trend. hello, mr. greenberg. >> hello, miss king. the bad news air fares. they'll go up between 8% and 12%. >> why? >> fewer airlines. consolidations mergers. we may see one ha
to sort of build a better environment for consumers, dr. sachs, where is the consumer today on being treated fairly by the banks, being given clear information, being not put in situations where they're going to go under water like still so many americans are with their mortgages? >> well, i think we're all confused. >> have any of them improved? >> i think there's probably a little improvement. i think elizabeth war knoren is going to make a big difference because she's going to be watching absolutely. i think the truth is the bankers still run the show in washington as well as on wall street. the thing about bailing out banks, even if you had to bail out the financial system, you don't have to bail out the bankers. and that's where they didn't know how to draw the line. and i think what you said, joe, is absolutely right. the campaign contributions have been the focus on both parties. this time they went wildly for the republican side because it's true. you do the slightest thing, it's indignation. you only gave us hundreds of billions of dollars of bailout. how dare you say a word
because of the -- of an environment that says, anything goes. so there's a reason for regulations. not just to stifle business. the police we see on their corneres are an example of regulation. that same idea goes up and beyond that. the financial things as well. >> host: ken in atlanta, georgia. you're on the air. >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen, this is just a treat. just a real pleasure to hear you and i've got some good news for you. right now, on youtube, there's a seven and a half minute film narrated by former president of georgia tech, incidentally georgia tech won the ball game the other day -- but georgia tech's president, the name of this film is, all american citizen team. and it is an effort that the georgia general assembly has been involved in since the 1970s, and we found out that there is a problem and it takes us back to a country western song, looking for love in all the wrong places. >> guest: one of our favorites. >> caller: we don't have problem with the government and we don't have a problem with elected officials. the problem turns out to be the folks
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)